Decline in Asbestos Use Yet Veterans and Seafarers Continue to Suffer

December 4, 2016

Ashley Stafford Community Outreach Volunteer www.TreatMesothelioma.org   Before asbestos dangers were discovered, the U.S Navy ships were made using toxic asbestos containing materials. This is one of the major reasons why U.S Navy veterans are at the highest risk of developing asbestos-related cancers like mesothelioma. The demand for materials with outstanding fire-proofing or insulation properties was higher in the U.S Navy than in any other military branch. That’s why the…

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Spamily – builder of ships, not nations

April 23, 2015

In a previous post I was musing about shipyards, ports, and other national assets that are often taken advantage of by being “privatized”, or otherwise utilized to enrich a select few.  Meanwhile the states, and its people, are burdened with the cost of developing and maintaining these assets. I find this grossly offensive myself. We only have to look to the Soviet State and its huge infrastructure, “sold” for fractions…

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Check out my Yas Yas !

March 31, 2015

I was sent these pictures some time ago, from a friend of the site in New Zealand, who was working on this beautiful ship, currently named Yas (ex-Swift 141). Always neat to see these engine rooms – a far cry from the crowded dank engine rooms of the numerous tugs I’ve worked on… BTW, she has 21000 hp installed.     You can read more about Yas’ specs here and…

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Bob might finally retire; WMI changes ownership

March 16, 2015

Captain Robert CE Kitching, President, Western Maritime Institute Western Maritime Institute’s parking lot was full to the brim last week when I went to visit. The institute’s founder, Capt. Bob Kitching states that he’s even had to find parking out on the road on some days. Capt Kitching founded Western Maritime Institute (WMI) back in 2000, on the site of a surplus elementary school, in a semi rural area, south…

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Winter ship rituals

January 21, 2015

Ocean Intrepid breaks ice, preparing for the arrival of Oceanex Avalon in Montreal As most know, the winters in Canada can be somewhat challenging. In the Great Lakes area, the winter of 2013-2014 was particularly good example of that statement, with record ice covering all of the Great Lakes and their inter-connecting rivers, well past the normal “ice season”. Some ships on Lake Superior even experienced breaking ice in late…

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So, how was your holiday season?

January 15, 2015

…from interwebs I’m still alive! You wouldn’t know it by the posts on this site but I am. Last year was just super busy personally and professionally, which left me little time to dedicate to the blog. Generally, each original post usually takes about 5-6 hrs to produce, believe it or not, which has been a challenge to fit into my schedule, already in perpetual flux. The constant bouncing around…

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Sixes, a quick way to a deep six

September 2, 2014

from the interwebs Is there anything worse than working “sixes”? I would submit that there is not. “Sixes” is a watch standing routine common to Canada. It is a brutal watch system where two people share the oversight responsibility amongst themselves, in particular on smaller vessels, like tugs. In the engine room the Chief Engineer stands the 6-12 watch, while the Second Engineer stands the 12-6 watch. These watches last…

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Where’s the money from ?

August 24, 2014

Davie Yard on the St Lawrence River near Quebec City In previous posts we explore the rebound and challenges of Davie Shipyard. The venerable shipyard, established 192 years ago sits across from Quebec City, on the St Lawrence River.  The shipyard is projecting a confident air about them, recently delivering a complex offshore construction vessel to European operators, with two more being completed, and two other ships on contract. Running…

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