Burrard Clean #9 cleans sandbar

March 23, 2013

In the previous blog post on The Monitor, there was a picture from the Vancouver Sun, with the the Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver presenting the Harper Government’s “World Class” tanker initiative earlier this week. In the background of the picture, there was a small vessel, an oil response vessel, the largest on Canada’s west coast. The Vancouver Sun followed up the Harper Government’s announcement story one day after, with…

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Costs of being a marine engineer

January 28, 2013

credit – interwebs A few weeks ago, I compiled a list of the steps required to achieving and maintaining a Transport Canada 1st Class Certificate of Competency. The list identifies the individual steps to hold a 1st Class and the associated cost not only in terms of money, but also in terms of time for training, in the “classroom”, and time served aboard a ship. I compiled one list for…

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The large Hebron provider

January 5, 2013

Source – Rigzone.com Super oil major, Exxon, and it’s partners, made it official today; they are committing to spending $14 billion on developing the Hebron offshore oil project in Eastern Canada. Situated in the Jeanne D’Arc Basin, about 350 km south east of St John’s in Newfoundland, the project will join nearby oil and gas operations Terra Nova, White Rose and the big one that launched it all, Hibernia. The…

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Reap what you sow

October 29, 2012

BCIT in Vancouver Western Canada’s only formal Marine Engineering school I’ve had the unique opportunity to be intertwined in many aspects of the marine industry in Canada. Whether is in my professional life working on ship across the nation, or through my hobby Marine Engineering website, www.dieselduck.net, I get to see many different perspectives. One of which, I would like to share with you, regarding the formal training of Marine…

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Survey says…

August 6, 2012

Apparently there is a shortage of experienced ship staff and operators. Specialized head hunting firms seemed to be popping up everywhere, while established, but non marine specialized ones, focus on to the high bounty paid as a result of a successful placement. However, I field inquiries suggesting that these established “land firms” have trouble understanding the challenges of “headhunting” in the seafaring world. This has resulted in some benefits to…

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The hammer drops (on Canadian cabotage)

July 25, 2012

McCleary’s Spirit, loaded, in Quebec My gut is big, and not necessarily pretty, but its usually accurate when it comes to intuition. I felt that any day now we would have work for our ship, a product tanker, or something drastic would happen. Well, as it turns out, the latter happened. If you follow this blog, you’ll recalled that the ship I sail on was recently been laid up in…

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Warning to the world (Thanks Mr. Harper)

July 11, 2012

All my shipmates, except myself and the Captains, have been given lay off notices; for us its just a matter of time before we get ours as well. It seems that the vessel is unable to find work in these parts. Our usual cargo was clean petroleum products, and we moved it around the St Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. Some guys were working aboard for ten years, a…

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Where does the time go…

February 14, 2012

I’ve been in the shipyard for the last three weeks, in Port Weller, to be exact. Our tug and barge are up for their surveys. Nothing too major, well except for that expensive steel repair bill. I’ve kept my head down, trying to get as much done as possible with the aim, like most engineers, to make sure things don’t break down later, when you really need them. Of course…

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