Oceanex takes delivery of Connaigra

September 28, 2013

Oceanex Conaigra leaving its German builders Today, Canada’s newest Canadian flagged cargo ship left its builders at Flensburger, in Germany, bound for Newfoundland and an excited crowd. The Oceanex Connaigra is owned and operated by St John’s based Oceanex. Oceanex operates the Oceanex Avalon, Cabot, Oceanex Sanderling and the Connaigra will join its fleetmates of RO/LOs serving the drop trailer, container service to Newfoundland and Labrador. Lori Caines, Spokesperson for…

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Oh sure, why not ! Anybody else…

August 18, 2013

I partly attribute my loss of a good job, and those of my 20 shipmates last year, to the ability of cargo owners to be quickly granted Canada Transportation Act waiver – where foreign owned ships, who pay no Canadian income tax (among others), hire no Canadians, yet operate in Canadian waters, or between Canadian ports. As a guy who’s invested pretty heavily in a seagoing Marine Engineering career, and…

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The large Hebron provider

January 5, 2013

Source – Rigzone.com Super oil major, Exxon, and it’s partners, made it official today; they are committing to spending $14 billion on developing the Hebron offshore oil project in Eastern Canada. Situated in the Jeanne D’Arc Basin, about 350 km south east of St John’s in Newfoundland, the project will join nearby oil and gas operations Terra Nova, White Rose and the big one that launched it all, Hibernia. The…

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Ship’s cook, victim of homicide onboard

September 25, 2012

Francois Hebert, Chief Cook, MV Umiavut, RIP The death of Francois Hebert, Quebec City based Chief Cook on board the Canadian flagged cargo ship MV Umiavut, has been ruled a homicide by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). He is reported to have died on Saturday, Sept 15th, but was discovered in his cabin, at around 9am the following morning, when he did not report for work. At the time,…

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Tombstone design

April 14, 2012

Tombstone design; that’s what my maritime school instructor use to characterize the maritime regulation making mechanism. Probably no bigger set of regulations has ever been imposed on the seafaring world, than the ones resulting from the sinking of the RMS Titanic. Unless you are a cavemen, having recently awoken from your long icy slumber, then I am sure you are well aware that the Royal Mail Ship Titanic, sank 100…

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2012 part 3 – Big plans

February 6, 2012

Continued from 2012 part 2 – From sea to sea to sea The big news of the 2011 was probably the National Ship Procurement Strategy. The much heralded NSPS is a great step forward, in the fact that the government recognized, after decades of neglect, that they need to build ships; then went on to try to figure out how to do it. A major accomplishment, but at the end…

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2012 part 2- From sea to sea to sea

February 3, 2012

Continue from 2012 part 1 of 3- Got Skills? Although trade numbers were generally up around the ports and seaways in 2011, there is a generalized unease about life across Canada, and in particular around the world. We are seeing lots of “established” ideas turn on their heads. This will continue to put strain on our “mental” comfort levels, but the marine industry I think, will continue a sure footed…

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2012 part 1 – Got Skills?

February 1, 2012

I get the feeling that the Marine industry is, has been, under the constant strain of “noise”, “heat” and “pressure”. Its kind of comforting for us engineer aboard, since this is our career, our kind of environment. We thrive in these conditions, and we are well position to weather the continuous “economic lows” on the prognosticator’s radar screens. Well figuratively speaking anyways. As I have done for a couple of…

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