Marine Engineering wages – Part 2 of 2

June 14, 2017

In part one of this thread, I theorized that the Canadian marine industry did not have an effective workforce succession plan, and therefore relies for its survival on what should be, the “fringe” groups within the make-up of the workforce. Without a larger, younger, but more experienced core to the workforce, the people who should be on the edges – the new entrants, and the soon to retire members of…

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How a hamburger affects your wage – Part 1 of 2

June 9, 2017

I was asked some time ago by a crewing manager, what a proper wage for a seagoing Marine Engineer should be. An answer was given, one that I detail in Part Two of this post, but in general, I could not answer her adequately, and it took me quite some time to mull it over; here’s what I think. As far as wages for Canadian certified Marine Engineers are concerned,…

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A pain in my… arm

May 14, 2017

We were in a maintenance period at the company’s dock in Quebec City, doing a fair bit of heavy stuff, things were moving fast and the pieces were big.  The pain started just before ten in the morning, in my right elbow, not quite at the tip, but very near it; I could feel the exact spot where the pain emanated from, deep within my arm, in the bone almost,…

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Is the neighbor’s green grass lacking morality?

March 28, 2016

Some time ago, I received an interesting email, using the term “morality”, or the lack thereof, in describing the offshore oil and gas industry. Morality is not often used in shipping, but maybe it ought to. I thought it was in interesting wording by a young professional, and in itself provided some insight in our maritime industry in general and its future. Here are parts of his emails, and my…

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