TC Blast

July 3, 2019

In case you have missed it, here are some marine industry related newsbits from Transport Canada and related regulators: TP 13617 – Ballast Water Regulations Please note that TP 13617 for the new proposed Ballast Water Regulations can be accessed on the following website. Navigation Safety Regulations, 2019 Please note that the Navigation Safety Regulations, 2019 have been published in the Canada Gazette, Part I (http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2019/2019-06-15/html/reg8-eng.html). The 90-day comment period…

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Canada Labour Code stakeholder feedback sought

July 3, 2019

I am writing to invite you to share your views on the development of regulations for recent amendments to Part III (Labour Standards) of the Canada Labour Code (Code). These amendments, introduced in Bill C-86 – the Budget Implementation Act, 2018, No. 2, aim to modernize the Code by improving protections for employees, particularly those in precarious work, while supporting productive workplaces. Once in force, they will: ·         make it easier…

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TC – catching up

May 9, 2019

For those that follow Transport Canada’s activities, yes, some of us do, as they have deep impact on how I feed my family, you may have noticed quite an increase in activity from them. The main story for TC Marine Safety these days is the updating of the Marine Personnel Regulations, to bring them inline with the IMO’s Manila Amendments of 2010 – yes, of the year 2010 – just…

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OCIMF extends access to Tanker Management and Self Assessment reports to non-members

March 2, 2019

10 January 2018 – London – OCIMF will extend access to Tanker Management and Self Assessment (TMSA) reports to non-OCIMF members from 14 January 2019. This major change will mean more information is available to more users, which will help improve overall safety and marine assurance. Access to TMSA reports was previously restricted to OCIMF members, but will now be extended to non-OCIMF members who are registered as Ship Inspection…

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It’s okay to say no

November 5, 2018

I was asked recently this question from a visitor, that I though someone else might empathize with, or provide insight. The Question: Is it necessary to consume alcohol onboard the ship? I heard that some crew members will force me to drink, but I don’t have a habit of consuming alcohol. My answer: I think what you are asking me, is whether you are required to drink while working onboard…

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Transport Canada seeking your input on new MPR

October 30, 2018

Marine Personnel Regulations – those regulations that dictate everything for professional seafarers in Canada – are coming – many years late (for STCW2010), but they are coming. As a seafarer in Canada I have been “blindsided” by lack of consultation in the past when drawing up these regs that directly affect us. Now, it looks like TC wants y/our input. Lets gives it to them. I will try to attend…

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Best Practices from the OCIMF

October 14, 2018

OCIMF releases new information paper on best practices for conducting navigational assessments OCIMF has today released a new information paper on best practices for conducting navigational assessments, called A Guide to Best Practice for Navigational Assessments and Audits. Navigational assessments and audits help vessel owners, operators and Masters to identify areas for improvement and increase safety. They also assure companies that high standards of navigation and watchkeeping are being maintained….

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It’s a good news bad news thing

June 26, 2018

For nearly 20 years now, Canada, and many jurisdictions, have steadily migrated to a Safety Management System, where cash strapped government essentially downloaded responsibility of enforcing safety regulations onto industry itself. Companies love it because, well, safety glasses, cliché slogans, and dubious reporting present fewer impediments to their cash flows, than knowledgeable safety inspectors working on behalf of the common good – the government and the citizen they represent. Occasionally,…

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