Skills Shortage? Age discrimination Alive in BC

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Matt
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Skills Shortage? Age discrimination Alive in BC

Postby Matt » Sun Jun 29, 2008 7:37 pm

I find it rather interesting that there is a skills shortage in the Marine Industry? I am a third class engineer who was laid off. Now I am in Alberta as the prospects for employment in BC is nil to none! The jobs that are out there do not pay Guild wages and age discrimination is definitely alive and well in BC! So if there is such a skills shortage why do the companies not want to hire the older engineers? Why does a skilled person need to live the Province of BC to make a living and rely on skills, talents and education that were obtained years ago.

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TxMarEng
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US as well

Postby TxMarEng » Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:04 am

Age discrimination is rampant here in the US as well. Most companies here these days would rather take on a younger person and overlook the experience and credentials of an older person.

Matt
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Age discrimination alive in BC!

Postby Matt » Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:19 am

It will be interesting to see how many others have had this problem? Thanks for your reply!

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conrod
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Old / Young ?

Postby conrod » Fri Jul 04, 2008 9:44 am

I think its all to do with brain washing !!

For those of us with 30 years under the belt, there is not much we have'nt seen. We tend to be a thorn in the side for Technical Managers. Add to that the return as the Bean Counters look at it. We demand more money, and better conditions. We are high cost / maintenance items.

Young kids just out of school, are grateful for a job. Demand less, cause little in the way of headaches, and with the potential of long term employment, can be written off on a balance sheet.

You employ a >45 year old Chief Engineer, even 15 years is looked at as short term, and there is always the chance he will walk after a couple because he gets frustrated with the young jerks in the office that think they know it all.

Experiance........well it makes me wonder these days what sort of skills you need, to be a viable proposition. A YES MAN, with a brown ring round your nose !! You can be molded to do just what the Office want you to do.

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The Dieselduck
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HR people

Postby The Dieselduck » Fri Jul 04, 2008 10:07 pm

I think you hit the nail on the head with your comments. Personally I haven't got a clue as to what HR dept wants and don't wants. When someone figures it out, let me know.

Taking the humans out of human resources !
Martin Leduc
Certified Marine Engineer and Webmaster
Martin's Marine Engineering Page
http://www.dieselduck.net

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TxMarEng
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Good Analysis

Postby TxMarEng » Thu Jul 31, 2008 7:37 am

Conrod seems to have the situation well appraised. I am now trying to get on with a maritime training facility or find someone who would like to establish their own in house training, preferable a company based operation with little success. In part I feel it is because of former union ties. My only demand is relocation and an operation somewhere away from the southern US. I taught for about 7 years at a union facility however the wages weren't adequate for the area. They would like me to return however, the cost of living in that area and relocation at this point in my life just isn't possible. Seems a shame to waste over 40 years of experience with all the needs for bringing on new people and training. Have had opportunities overseas however, my wife is a nurse and has her own career which couldn't be practiced in most of the European countries.

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conrod
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Teaching

Postby conrod » Thu Jul 31, 2008 7:48 am

TxMarEng,

I think that teaching our younger breatheren is a great idea. Although, we may have no formal education teaching qualifications, I think many younger engineers fail to recognise, that one day they will be in our positions..............C/E or Super...............without having learn't very much at all. I take my hat of to DD for stepping up to the plate, and recognising that fact that there is a whealth of knowledge out there.

Martins forum here is a good starting point. Perhaps an online school, similar in structure to online degrees .............I have not given it much thought, as a formal platform.

As for age, well, as the saying goes, time will tell..............and engines still break down...........but you will not be able to use the excuse......we did not do that in school...........when your tossing around the ogin in a F10 !!

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Postby kotik » Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:15 am

Here in Europe there is so big shortage of skilled engineers that companies actually goes to great lengths to persuades retired engineers to come back and work, I have worked with several "reactivated" engineers.

The biggest problem with these engineers many times they cant handle computers but otherwise it is very educational to work with them. I actually learned more from one 1 st engineer I worked with for 4 weeks then I learned in 10 years working in the engineering department on ships.

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JK
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Postby JK » Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:49 am

We have had retired engineers come back and work as oilers and loved it. Go where they are pointed,no responsibilities.

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conrod
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Retired

Postby conrod » Fri Aug 01, 2008 12:02 pm

JK,

For sure that has got to look attractive. If you retired, then obviously you do not - I pressume - NEED to work, but just enjoy the job, and atmosphere of being at sea...........like I do..........so taking on a position slightly lower than you were before, with no reponsibility, really appeals.

I used to joke that on my next trip I would go back as a 3/E; just imagine, no paperwork, no middle of the night calls, no stores ordering, or being berated by the Old Man.........what a thought.

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JK
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Postby JK » Fri Aug 01, 2008 12:39 pm

Yeh, you wouldn't want to come back like one fellow who came back from retirement as 2nd and accidentally tripped the halon system, in the emer gen rm, the first week he was there.
What a headache that was!

Matt
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What does anyone consider old??

Postby Matt » Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:03 pm

Try 58? 59?...what is old??? Every young person will be in this position as they age. There is a shortage but there are also good capable individuals with the qualifications needed even if they are not totally up to speed on computers. But guess what one can always learn!!!:) at any age.

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ArkSeaJumper
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Postby ArkSeaJumper » Thu Aug 07, 2008 5:06 am

Age should not be a restriction, if you can pass you medical and you want to, them you should be allowed to work at sea.

We have had a 78 year old working on our vessels, (I don’t think he got on with his wife).
I went onboard one day just before the ship sailed to present him with a Medal, (British Merchant Marine) (Long service medal), called him on the bridge, and asked him what age he was, he panicked, he though I was going to stop him sailing.

The main problem though is going to be the Medical, It can be a physical job.

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JK
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Postby JK » Thu Aug 07, 2008 6:17 am

We have a Chief on the books that is 75 or 76. Don't know if he is going to pass his next medical, but with all the new parts they are putting on him, he will be the bionic Chief.

And here in Canada, take a good look at some of the Inspectors at TC the next time you are in their office. It is like the geriatic ward (sorry fellows :oops: )


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