correction factor

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adreno1981
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correction factor

Postby adreno1981 » Sun Jul 11, 2010 9:19 pm

can sm1 throw sm light on temperature correction factor and volume correction factor for diesel and heavy oil...their values..n tables indicating their values...

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JK
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Re: correction factor

Postby JK » Mon Jul 12, 2010 12:49 am

Please do not use text type in your message.
No one is going to answer if they have to decipher the question!

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D Winsor
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Re: correction factor

Postby D Winsor » Mon Jul 12, 2010 5:23 pm

It is the universal standard that when figuring out the volume of fuel in a tank the temperature correction is set to 1 at 15 degC.
As fuel is heated or cooled it expands or contracts at a set rate for every degree change in temperature, depending on specific gravity. Multiplying the measured volume of fuel in a tank, not the tonnage, by the temperature correction factor will give you the volume in the tank as if the fuel was at 15 degC. It also creates a constant which eliminates one of the variables when trying to figure out specific fuel consumption, compensating for the discrepancy between delivery slip meter reading and tank soundings and tank gauging system errors.
Troubleshooting 101 "Don't over think it - K.I.S.S. it"

adreno1981
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Re: correction factor

Postby adreno1981 » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:34 pm

hey jk,
thanks for advice..will do remember that in future..i didnt mean to offend anyone.i just wanted to share my doubt with the freinds on the site. :D

adreno1981
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correction factor

Postby adreno1981 » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:43 pm

weii windsor ,
thanks for your answer.but you know, i actually wanted to know the value , i mean i remember something vague , that we used to consider values like 0.00065 for heavyoil , and value 0.000067 for diesel oil.it was something of this kind , i remember doing when i was 4th engineer.formula used to be something like , suppose oheavy il is attemperature of 60 deg celsius; density of oil at 15 deg celsius is 0.98 t/cu m ; then for density of oil at 60 deg celsius , its ; .98 ( 1 - 0.00065 * 45 ) ....something of this kind , can i get some chart where exact correction factor like 0.00065 , 0.00067 ...etc is given for all kinds of oils and chemicals..or in particular for the oils we use on board..sorry to bother and thanks in advance for taking the initiative to reply the question.
adios
adreno

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D Winsor
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Re: correction factor

Postby D Winsor » Wed Jul 14, 2010 7:33 am

I don't Know where you live but Exxon-Mobile or Imperial Oil in Canada has a publication which has a complete set of correction tables in it. The publication may be available on line from their web site
Troubleshooting 101 "Don't over think it - K.I.S.S. it"

martin_woodcock
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Re: correction factor

Postby martin_woodcock » Sat Nov 13, 2010 3:58 am

If this helps I have an example of the calculation for Specific Gravity of a fuel oil at a temperature other than 15 degrees celcius.

SG@98 = SG@15 - 0.00064 (98-15)

This is as written by my lecturer in one of my last classes for Chief Engineer level theory.

Hope this helps :oops:

adreno1981
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Re: correction factor

Postby adreno1981 » Thu Mar 31, 2011 8:11 pm

thanks dear.it did. :)


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