TC Exams

Going through the licensing process ? Have queries, comments, or do you need an answer to that obscure exam question ? This is the place to post.
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SkyHawk
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TC Exams

Postby SkyHawk » Mon Mar 21, 2011 5:13 pm

Well I just want to put it out there and ask people out there, their experience with TC Exams.

I know this is a engineer's site and I'm a navigator, so I'll start with the EK2 Exam since its Engineering...lol.

Just some of the questions they are asking as a navigator why do I need to know the steps in firing up an auxiliary boiler? or the warming through process for a steam turbine. So after writing that exam I guess I can now go down to the ER and start a boiler...lol

Have your exams converted over to any new exams yet or still using old ones? Some of our exams have switched over but in others still using the old ones.

Max Oiltemp
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Re: TC Exams

Postby Max Oiltemp » Mon Mar 21, 2011 7:05 pm

Well, Sky, I'm guessing they ask you these things in order that navigators have some appreciation of what it takes to keep a ship running smoothly and what goes on below decks under different circumstances. Starting up an auxiliary boiler isn't just the same as plugging in a kettle; getting under way on a turbine ship takes more than just turning the ignition key - and after passing that exam, you'll be aware of just how different it is! Just like engineers are learning that it takes more to navigate a ship than simply plugging waypoints into the GPS and switching on the autopilot, or pressing the 'Hold Position' button on the DP system. Well, that's what I've been told, anyways :mrgreen:

I'm afraid I can't comment on the current exams; when I did my last set there was a good chance I'd be asked about slide valves on reciprocating steam engines. Hopefully, they've progressed from there somewhat.

Best Regards,
Max

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SkyHawk
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Re: TC Exams

Postby SkyHawk » Tue Mar 22, 2011 5:09 am

Well I understand that As a navigator that we should know something about the engine room, but why don't engineers know something about the bridge...lol. I would love to see a engineer come plug in 100 waypoints into the GPS for once. It's not like I havn't gone down to the ER and helped unplug sea box of ice... hahaha

But, why have to know the steps of the fireing up process or warming through process? I think things should be more generalized and just know that it takes a while to start up a steam turbine, or gas turbine and they are uaually direct dirve or a boilor takes time to warm up, and just like you say its not as simple as plugging in the kettle. Oh Well.

From what I hear on the Navigation side, is that when some of these new exam take effect there will be like 200 questions for each eaxm will be randomized out of those 200 questions as ask 5-7 questions (some questions have a and b). Is this happening for you Engineers? Well I think when the CSA 2001 came into efect your tickets didn't get messed around with like ours, maybe your exams are staying the same.

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JK
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Re: TC Exams

Postby JK » Tue Mar 22, 2011 6:32 am

Rest assured, you wouldn't be starting my boilers LOL. However, I would go to the Bridge and plug in your kettle for you! Steam and hot water enough.
I am sure you sailed on ships where the C\E was the 5th Mate?

Max Oiltemp
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Re: TC Exams

Postby Max Oiltemp » Tue Mar 22, 2011 3:54 pm

The exam structure sounds similar to what it was when I wrote. They gave you nine questions of which you had to answer six - and it invariably turned out that the first three cards I turned over had questions for which I had no idea of the answers :shock:. It was always a good idea to memorize those unanswered questions, however, as they were usually the first three things the examiner would ask in the orals! Ah..., the Good Old Days :lol:

it takes a while to start up a steam turbine, or gas turbine and they are uaually direct dirve


Oh, dear....,

Unless I've taken that out of context, I think you've just helped me make my point :wink:

I'm sitting, as I write, on the bridge of a DSV in Angola (don't you just love the internet?). The engine control room is on the bridge on this vessel and over my monitors I can see the 2nd mate sitting in his fancy chair staring off into space with his feet resting on the DP console. I don't claim to know enough to do the job of a navigating officer but because I have to be able to fix it, I know how the DP system works and while it might take longer for me to dial in position changes than it takes him, I can still do it. And forgive me, but plugging in 100 waypoints is pretty much the same as plugging in one waypoint over and over again a hundred times! Now if you were taking star shots and determining your position within a mile or two - that would be different!

We're here to do different things and the exams show that we understand - not just memorize - some of the other department's operations and capabilities. Do they require overly detailed answers on subjects for which we are not responsible on board? Perhaps, but engineers have to understand and answer questions on stability in considerable detail - and isn't that the responsibility of the first mate?

I'm guessing that the exams you're doing now aren't for Master Mariner. By the time you do write them - and I'm sure you will - all will become clear - in particular the sometimes tricky relationship between oil and water.

I'll get down off my soapbox, now.... :mrgreen:

Best regards,
Max

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JollyJack
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Re: TC Exams

Postby JollyJack » Fri Apr 08, 2011 4:51 am

Now how did I miss this one? I'm of the opinion that the only Engineering Knowledge required by deck officers is the Chief's phone number. It's said that a little knowledge is dangerous, and nothing is truer, believe me! Deck officers, with their inherent superciliousness, take is as a given that becuase they have a vague idea an engine goes suck-squeeze-bang-blow that they know all there is to know about Engineering. I have had 2nd Mates over ride my decisions as Chief (with 1st Class!) and be backed up by the Captain! (They were both from PEI, I'm a CFA, so that would probably explain it).

However, although that may be a general rule, it is not an exclusive one. One of the best captains I ever sailed with insisted that "water and oil should mix". It was a reefer, running bananas from Equador to the Med. He involved the Mates in engine room overhauls (he, himself, cleaned out the tubes in the Gene cooler) and Engineers in bridge activities, including port entries. In consequence, the 6 month trip was a happy one on a happy ship. The PEI clique merely divided and fragmented the crew of the former vessel.

Incidentally, I noticed in Reeds Engineering Knowlege for Deck Officers, some of the info is erroneous. eg, the stern tube is a hybrid between oil filled and latern ring gland. Don't know if that's deliberate or what :)
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Max Oiltemp
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Re: TC Exams

Postby Max Oiltemp » Fri Apr 08, 2011 5:11 pm

I'm a CFA, so that would probably explain it


I'll bet there's a bit of head-scratching going on about that one :D

Me too (ex BC Ferries, among others)! I hadn't thought of it but it may have had some bearing on the one instance I had wherein a new captain tried to tell me how to run the engine room. His way or the hiway, as it were. Long story short, two weeks later I was working for another company. No need to put up with that spit.

It was certainly the exception, however. Two of my best friends are captains from the Island and I know a number of others with whom I'm always pleased to sail. In my experience, I've found it helps if the deck guys have at least a modicum of understanding when you're trying to explain why the ship won't go. On the few occasions in the past where I've seen them try to use it to over-rule the C/E, a request to have them to sign an appropriate entry in the engine room logbook usually cooled their jets. Never had to use it myself, though - I think there's more of an awareness now that we're actually on the same team. Geez, sounds like some of that H.R. bumf has finally rubbed off on me.... :roll:

Regards, Max

PS - Martin, is there a way to get the postings to left-align? Thx.


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