Engine Room Rating course available Western Canada

Going through the licensing process ? Have queries, comments, or do you need an answer to that obscure exam question ? This is the place to post.
User avatar
The Dieselduck
Administrator
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:41 pm
Currently located: Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada (West Coast of Canada)

Engine Room Rating course available Western Canada

Postby The Dieselduck » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:27 pm

Western Maritime Institute’s Transport Canada approved Engine Room Rating program provides excellent entry level training for those who have little or no marine experience but would like to work in the marine industry initially as an Engine Room Assistant. Combining hands-on and theoretical training, this 9-week long program introduces students to the knowledge required to assist Marine Engineers with maintaining the vessel’s engines, machinery, and other engineering equipment.

The program meets the requirements set out in STCW Code Section A-III/4 and Transport Canada TP 10933B.

Admission Requirements
• Grade 12 preferred or mature student status.
• Seafarer’s Medical for Transport Canada: It is strongly recommended (but not required) that you schedule a Seafarers Medical, with an approved Transport Canada doctor, prior to the program start date to ensure that you are physically able to undertake employment in the marine industry. Tuition fee/deposits are not refunded based on the results of your Seafarer’s Medical.
• Candidate Document Number (CDN) from Transport Canada.

Engine Room Rating Sea Time Requirement

Graduates from Western Maritime Institute’s Transport Canada approved Engine Room Rating program will be credited three months of qualifying sea service applicable to the Engine Room Rating and Fourth-Class Engineer certificates. That means, by successfully completing this program, instead of requiring six months of engine room sea service to sit the Transport Canada ERR exams, graduates only need three months of sea service, which can be obtained after completing the program.

ERR Courses Details:
Engine Room Rating $5,000.00 Feb. 13 – Mar. 26, 2018
Marine Basic First Aid $295.00 Mar. 27 – 28, 2017
MED STCW Basic Safety Training $1,690.00 Apr. 2 – 7, 2018
MED STCW Proficiency in Survival Craft $1,120.00 Apr. 10 - 13, 2018

Students are required to have all four courses in order to obtain their Engine Room Rating certificate. Students who have completed their MEDs and Marine First Aid course elsewhere will be required to provide those certificates prior to receiving the ERR certificate.

Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the Engine Room Rating program, graduates should be able to:
• Operate and service main propulsion and auxiliary machinery
• Carry out engine room watchkeeping duties
• Read indicating instruments related to engine room watchkeeping duties and understand the significance of the readings
• Use hand and portable power tools
• Maintain temperatures, pressures, and proper oil/water levels in the engine room
• Understand and apply safe working procedures related to engine room operations
• Tell the difference between various engine room alarms especially those related to fire suppression
• Use internal communication systems and read, write, and interpret instructions and messages related to Watchkeeping duties.

For more info or to register:

website: http://www.maritimeed.com/engine-room-rating/

Western Maritime Institute
Tollfree| 1-866-632-6888 Phone| 250-245-4455 Fax| 250-245-8881
3519 Hallberg Road, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1K1

User avatar
JollyJack
Fleet Engineer
Posts: 1124
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:57 am
Currently located: Eastern Canada

!

Postby JollyJack » Thu Nov 16, 2017 9:37 pm

$8000 bucks? That's a year's tuition in a University Bachelor's degree! Why would anyone waste that much money when ERRs are not required anyway?
Discourage incest, ban country "music".

MarineEduc
First Time Poster
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:56 am

Re: Engine Room Rating course available Western Canada

Postby MarineEduc » Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:58 am

Thanks for that feedback. Our students find the opportunity to have their education count towards sea time very beneficial and the price is reflective of how much it costs to put a student through this program without the usual government subsidies. I forgot to mention that in support of our move into offering Engineering courses, the Canadian Institute of Marine Engineering (CIMarE) have donated a scholarship towards this program, so that will help at least one eligible student reduce the cost. ERR certified ERAs are still actively being recruited by BC Ferries, Canadian Coast Guards, multiple off shore oil and gas companies on the east coast, and internationally, as I'm sure you're well aware. In the end, the aim is to get more Marine Engineers trained to join the industry and especially to attract younger people who can grow in their career and the ERR is a great starting point for them. Feel free to PM if you have any questions about WMI or this program.

User avatar
JollyJack
Fleet Engineer
Posts: 1124
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:57 am
Currently located: Eastern Canada

Re: Engine Room Rating course available Western Canada

Postby JollyJack » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:12 am

Why isn't the shipping industry paying for training? After all, they benefit from it. On the other hand, when STCW 2010 is fully implemented and STCW Certificates are regarded equally, you won't need Canadian ERRs and Engineers in the Canadian shipping industry, third world crews are much, much cheaper.
Discourage incest, ban country "music".

User avatar
The Dieselduck
Administrator
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:41 pm
Currently located: Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada (West Coast of Canada)

Re: Engine Room Rating course available Western Canada

Postby The Dieselduck » Sat Nov 25, 2017 4:17 pm

yes, aside from dodging taxes, and providing little support to the communities they operate in, a great number of industry rely on public funded infrastructure to supply them the trained labour they require. There was a time when they would train their own staff under apprentice schemes. I guess we are just used to being squeezed and squeezed.
Martin Leduc
Certified Marine Engineer and Webmaster
Martin's Marine Engineering Page
http://www.dieselduck.net

User avatar
The Dieselduck
Administrator
Posts: 2737
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 1:41 pm
Currently located: Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada (West Coast of Canada)

Re: Engine Room Rating course available Western Canada

Postby The Dieselduck » Sat Nov 25, 2017 8:29 pm

On Slashdot today, not super relevant, but insightful...

Slashdot reader pefisher writes:
A lot of us on Slashdot have noticed that potential employers advertise for things they don't need. To the point that sometimes they even ask for things that don't exist. Like asking for ten years of experience in a technology that has only just been introduced. It's frustrating because it makes you wonder "what's this employers real game?"

Do they just want to say they advertised for the position, or are they really so immensely stupid, so disconnected from their own needs, that they think they are actually asking for something they can have...? Here is a Harvard Study that addresses one particular angle of this. It doesn't answer any questions, but it does prove that you aren't crazy. And it quantifies the craziness.

The study's author calls it "degree inflation," and after studying 26 million job postings concluded that employers are now less willing to actually train new people on the job, possibly to save money. "Many companies have fallen into a lazy way of thinking about this," the study's author tells The Street, saying companies are "[looking for] somebody who is just job-ready to just show up." The irony is that college graduates will ultimately be paid a higher salary -- even though for many jobs, the study found that a college degree yields zero improvement in actual performance.

The Street reports that "In a market where companies increasingly rely on computerized systems to cull out early-round applicants, that has led firms to often consider a bachelor's degree indicative of someone who can socialize, run a meeting and generally work well with others." One company tells them that "we removed the requirement to have a computer science degree, and we removed the requirement to have experience in development computer programming. And when we removed those things we found that the pool of potential really good team members drastically expanded."
Martin Leduc
Certified Marine Engineer and Webmaster
Martin's Marine Engineering Page
http://www.dieselduck.net


Return to “Training Room”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest