Procedures for starting these machines

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winhlaingoo
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Procedures for starting these machines

Postby winhlaingoo » Thu Sep 18, 2008 7:59 am

I would like to know what are the systematic procedures for starting these machines.

(1) Generator
(2) Compressor
(3) Purifier
(4) Boiler
(5) Oily water separator
(6) Fresh Water Generator

And, if possible , i would like to get the names of safety devices for those machines. :mrgreen:
Thanks.

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JK
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Re: Procedures for starting these machines

Postby JK » Thu Sep 18, 2008 2:17 pm

Looks like someone is working on their 3rds EKG

tianyayouzidu
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Re: Procedures for starting these machines

Postby tianyayouzidu » Sat Oct 04, 2008 7:30 pm

I also want to know!

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The Dieselduck
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Re: Procedures for starting these machines

Postby The Dieselduck » Mon Oct 06, 2008 3:38 pm

winhlaingoo wrote:I would like to know what are the systematic procedures for starting these machines.

And, if possible , i would like to get the names of safety devices for those machines. :mrgreen:
Thanks.



(1) Generator
A long time ago when I was a cadet I wrote this up and you can find my answer to this in the Machinery section of the main site under "Electrical Systems" or click here http://www.dieselduck.ca/machine/03%20e ... ng_gen.htm

(2) Compressor
I am not sure what kind of air compressor you are talking about, but generally its a Sphere (sp?) or JP Sauer type two stage, air cooled (see picture) so not too much to it. Like all machines check the oil level. Open discharge valve to system, valve to unloaded valve if equip with it. Make sure the space is well ventilated. Start machine, listen for noise, once in a while I just check the safety valve by manually lifting it to make sure its not seized up.

(3) Purifier
I assume this is for a fuel purifier: Fill your settling tank. Check/clean suction filter of FOP feed pump. Start steam tracing if not already on. Check to make sure FOP CC has enough oil, that the brake is off. Open service air to unit, open service water to unit; make sure both are at the required pressures. Start feed pump, check for circulation, once confirmed start heating system. I usually start heating manually (using steam bypass) to bring the temperature of the heater in a more controlled manner otherwise you will have lots of High Temp alarms until the controller can handle it, once close to 85-90 then switch to automatic. While waiting for heater to heat up, start main power for separator and let it run up to speed checking for unusual noises and vibrations. You should now have a fully running separator, up to speed temp, so you can now start the process using the computer... which does the following automatically (manually if the machine is older) flush the bowl, close it, then fill it with water. once water is observed in the overflow pipe, turn the make up water off, then wait a few seconds to let is stabilize then switch over from re-circ to process. Set back pressure to .2 bar or so depending on mfg; later on adjust flow, then back pressure according to need for conditions. The slower the volume going through the better. ...and voila. I probably missed a couple of steps there, but the important thing is to get the fuel to the right temp and flowing through the pipes before you try to put it through the separator. Check the machinery page for a guide on cleaning a small diesel purifier http://www.dieselduck.ca/machine/04%20a ... arator.pdf.

(4) Boiler
Well these procedures are usually quite vessel specific, and the rest are basic but crucial and pretty much all covered in the "Duck Notes #1" I have posted in the "Ship's Library" (http://www.dieselduck.ca/library/03%20r ... _fails.htm). Basically the firing up calls for lots of patience! Most boilers have a firing up procedure built into their control system and consist of a set purge (usually about one minute purge, then fuel for 5 seconds while ignitor is active) and firing protocol. Then cold boiler firing and normal firing. The cold procedure being a gradual warming of the unit, sometimes firing every ten minutes for hrs, then steady fire, but on lowest setting, until a pressure of, say 2-4 bar is reached, then gradually increasing fuel to bring it to full pressure and temperature. Once full pressure is reached, it can be brought online, having pre heated the lines before hand.

The safeties are numerous on the boiler. The whole point being not to feed any fuel into a boiler incapable of burning it and or absorbing the heat from it. So you will have a "fire eye" that will shut fuel if no sustained fire/flame is present, also some pressure sensors for the draught air pressure. You will have low and high drum water sensor. Pressure sensors for control and safety, but usually the safety relief valve are the physical pressure relief valve. Like above I probably forgot a few things there.

(5) Oily water separator
Prime the unit with clean water - should have been done by last user - check suction strainer to unit, purge out oil - make sure you have enough room in waste oil tank to run unit. Call bridge and find out whether or not you are able to run the unit (location, speed). Check / clean, calibrate, if able, oil content meter and test three way valve and its alarm. Unlock overboard valve, open service water and service air to unit. Check your license liability insurance. Run unit, log procedures quantities in Oil Record Book

(6) Fresh Water Generator
Woaaa! that's allot of questions. Well with this, what you need to do is practice, as I think bringing it online is a bit of an art form. Anybody can bring these online but there are some operators that way more efficient than others (I am talking about big 600tons/day units). The biggest problem of these, the larger installation anyways, is the location and setting of valves which can only be passed on from local knowledge. The basic theory of it, is to build vacuum first, preheat gently using steam if available, then switch over to Main Engine FW slowly (allowing time for the amot valves to compensate) then increase production slowly where you consume the least amount of steam, but maximize water production. Look for several papers on Fresh Water Generators in the next main site update - in November. Production should start around 72-75 degrees with a pretty good quality (1-2ppm) around 84 degrees). One crucial component for this machine is proper chemical dosing. Dont assume that if the dosing pump is running the product is going into the sw feed line; keep tabs on chemical consumption and measure daily consumption against mfg or best practice. There are not too many safety devices for these machines, but there are usually more than one salinometer connected to a three way dump valve, this should be working well, otherwise your hair will be standing up all over the place after a shower, which is fine for most deck people since they are ugly and bald and rarely consume the water anyways.


Anyways, hope that helps. That's off the top of my head so I am sure they are not perfect, but I hope the above procedures point you in the right direction, besides, you have to do some of your homework too!
Attachments
MVC-723F.JPG
A small coagulescent bead type OWS on a coastal vessel
MVC-723F.JPG (83.75 KiB) Viewed 3283 times
DM.engine_room042.jpg
Alfa Laval LO separator
DM.engine_room042.jpg (111.61 KiB) Viewed 3284 times
DM.engine_room019.jpg
Alfa Laval evaporator 600t/day
DM.engine_room019.jpg (94.37 KiB) Viewed 3284 times
Serck Como 600t Evap.11.jpg
Serck Como 600t/day evap
Serck Como 600t Evap.11.jpg (208.95 KiB) Viewed 3285 times
2008.05-DR Engine Room.16.jpg
Westfalia separators: in picture - first. LO, FO2, FO1, Diesel. Heaters on bulkhead.
2008.05-DR Engine Room.16.jpg (3.55 MiB) Viewed 3293 times
JP Sauer Air Comp.jpg
JP Sauer type two stage, air cooled
JP Sauer Air Comp.jpg (39.38 KiB) Viewed 3272 times
Martin Leduc
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TxMarEng
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Re: Procedures for starting these machines

Postby TxMarEng » Sat Nov 29, 2008 11:22 am



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