The Roof's out of 'er

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JK
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The Roof's out of 'er

Postby JK » Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:44 am

Looking up 4 decks to the skylight.
Actually a big jeezly hole to take out machinery.

You can't really tell in this photo, but whoever cut out the massive beam structure did a masterful job.


Look Up.jpg

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Merlyn
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Re: The Roof's out of 'er

Postby Merlyn » Thu Apr 07, 2016 5:50 am

I remember that kind of view from way back on turbine ships where when on deck you looked thro raised skylights down several decks to the turbine sets way down below and the heat coming up. Long way down but like the Chief back then used to tell you, don't worry it's not the fall that kills you, its when you hit the deck.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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JK
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Re: The Roof's out of 'er

Postby JK » Tue Apr 12, 2016 3:39 am

The old steamer had a skylight. Every once in a while you'd get a shower, while standing between the engines, from the deck gang hosing soot from the decks and superstructure.
There was limited AC power, so the landing railings were always hung with drying clothing. Jeans would dry like a board lol.

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Merlyn
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Re: The Roof's out of 'er

Postby Merlyn » Tue Apr 12, 2016 7:26 am

Fond memories of large flogging spanners being dropped from engineroom skylights on steamships as this was even higher up than the top catwalk of the cylinder heads causing the landing behind you to go off in your ear like a twelve bore shotgun being let go. The only warning was a cry " below " followed by the three foot long spanner landing on the chequered plates, definitely not for the faint hearted. Even if you were working on an open crank or on top of the turbine casing this was an experience never to be forgotten. They used to say our old firm had a majority input concerning health and safety regulations and looking back on it all I can well believe it. During my five years no one ever " copped one " which was just as well considering the velocity the flogging spanner must have attained on contact with the deck.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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JollyJack
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Re: The Roof's out of 'er

Postby JollyJack » Tue Apr 12, 2016 10:38 am

I can recall a 2nd who came pretty close to meeting a flogging spanner falling from the upper piston beam on a Doxford to the floor plates. "It was an accident Chief, it fell out my oily hands!"
Discourage incest, ban country "music".

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JK
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Re: The Roof's out of 'er

Postby JK » Wed Apr 13, 2016 2:16 pm

I was once told of a engineer who hated the fellow on watch. He sat up in the upper ER platform and repeatedly shorted out a tank alarm while watching the fellow on the platform. He never let it ring long enough for the engineer to actually see what was alarming. Just about drove the fellow mad.

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The Dieselduck
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Re: The Roof's out of 'er

Postby The Dieselduck » Sat Apr 16, 2016 5:44 am

Ohh thats cruel.

The only ship that Ive been on that had skylights was the Tanu, I was such a nice feature too look up and see blue sky and natural light.
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