ER noise level

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The Dieselduck
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ER noise level

Postby The Dieselduck » Fri Aug 02, 2019 4:04 pm

Anyone have any research or documentation on engine room noise. What is the decibel level for the average medium speed (800 rpm) engine room for something like a large coast guard patrol boat - i estimate around 120 decibels, anyone have any better numbers?
Martin Leduc
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Merlyn
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Re: ER noise level

Postby Merlyn » Sat Aug 03, 2019 2:31 am

Depends where you are standing and if your ear defenders are working 100%
But don't worry, get enough hours in down below and you'll be like me losing it a bit in one ear.
Has its good points when on leave taking a bollocking from the wife and you develop that knack of hearing only the good news.
Or forgetting something and blaming it on all those hours spent not in the control room but out on the job in the ER,
This of course proves beyond all doubt that you are a proper marine engineer and not a control room dweller.
( i.e. A bus conductor type character as I have mentioned before )
Just thought I would mention it so you have something to look forward to in life.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Merlyn
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Re: ER noise level

Postby Merlyn » Sat Aug 03, 2019 9:36 pm

Way back when I measured engine noise levels by downloading an android app.from the net on my mobile phone. measured ER noise levels no probs.
Brain just remembered
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Big Pete
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Re: ER noise level

Postby Big Pete » Sat Aug 03, 2019 11:37 pm

A lot of noise can be eliminated by good design, it is always too high, I don't think that there is an acceptably high level of noise, it all causes long term damage to your hearing.
Reducing structural transmission of noise/vibration helps, such as with Diesel Electric ships where the generator sets are mounted resiliently. Acoustic enclosures for high noise machinery such as air compressors helps. Proper maintenance of the rubber seals on doors around the machinery spaces stops noise leaking into the Control Room, workshop and accommodation. Use of Soft sound absorbent material would help, I am not suggesting scatter cushions and curtains everywhere, but in a house they make a huge difference, as anyone who has been round an empty house and come back when it is furnished can tell you. Years ago a system was developed that had microphones all round noisy spaces that picked up the noise, shifted it out of phase and re broadcast it, so that the Broadcast sound waves cancelled out the natural ones, worked very well on trials but was never adopted, probably too expensive and if it went wrong it could have doubled the noise level!

BP.
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JK
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Re: ER noise level

Postby JK » Tue Aug 06, 2019 6:19 am

Ha, noise levels, we went all through that with one of our older ships.
It depends on :
propeller noise
auxiliaries
turbos,
silencers,
exhaust gas system spring hangers
ventilation, supply and exhaust
hydraulics
reduction gears
insulation,
piping and pipe supports
resilient mounts and isolation

Those patrol vessels with go fast engines seem to be the noisiest ones.

Does it translate to a noisy accommodations or messrooms? If it is over MOSH requirements, then something is required to be done.

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Merlyn
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Re: ER noise level

Postby Merlyn » Wed Aug 07, 2019 12:46 am

And RPM
I reckon those squirters are the worst.
Up on the top end of the governors for most of their lives.
Screamers all day X 4 of 'em performing ( well down to 3 a lot of times )
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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camshaft
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Re: ER noise level

Postby camshaft » Tue Aug 20, 2019 10:07 pm

Martin, I'm thinking that by average engine room level you don't mean the average of a bunch of different locations in an engine room but the expected noise level for a given engine installation? I only have figures from memory and engineers who are working should have real numbers because these are supposed to be regularly measured and the readings supplied to the worksite.
What I recall is standing close between two 900 RPM two stroke engines was about 118 decibels. Between a couple of 500 or 900 RPM four strokes is more like 110 - 115 decibels. This was where the highest levels were (I think that's right where Merlyn is standing in his avatar? - with no ear protection). I think your 120 decibel guess is pretty good but maybe a bit high as I don't recall ever seeing anything that high, although screaming kilowatts in a small engine room could be there.
Speaking of which, everyone called them "Screaming Jimmies" but I never thought they were that bad.


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