Welding on crane boom

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Redroof
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Redroof » Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:09 am

Ok, I will admit to Glencannon ringing a bell, but you may have to elaborate!
As for the Raytek thermometer, we have these, I even have one at home for my wood burner flue (just because I wanted to know), and for my Land Rover, looking for the overheating bearing/ diff etc.....
As for the Monel metal medal, what chatter do we have to put to bed and can I submit my own preference of material? The reason being, I have propeller trimmings from a BP tanker in my garage, about 2000kg of phospor bronze that I have no real use for.....

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Redroof
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Redroof » Wed Sep 28, 2016 8:34 am

Hhahah, I meant 200kg, not 2 tonne!!!!! Glad there are no full addresses on here!

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Wed Sep 28, 2016 10:53 am

Kg's?
Pounds shillings and pence over here, ( maybe coming back and scrapping that m.m. Measurement, you know the one, Mickey Mouse )
I am wondering about the rest of the tanker, not my old ship I hope? British Loyalty?)
The chatter?
Why G.T.C.
Gear train chatter.
Or did you pinch my "taking of the leads idea " and for good measure left the leads on both sides of the teeth still in there?
Silent running or what?
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Redroof
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Redroof » Wed Sep 28, 2016 2:31 pm

Prop trimmings from the British Esteem circa 2006 after some interesting time in the Baltic ice. Ship came into Grangemouth and my now wife came over from the west coast to visit and took the trimmings away, shhhh, dont tell anyone....... Plan was always to mount one on a nice bit of wood but I dont have a wall strong enough!
GTC eh? If only, it turned out to be a clock gauge jobby according to Wartsila, I was over thinking it. Havent taken leads for some time, last time was on a Tanabe compressor on an '83 built bulky. Most certainly not silent running.
Old man said 'put him on the shake' at dinner tonight. Many people didnt have a clue, especially when I said, 'about half way down Captain?'
These offshore bods rarely see into the merch life or psyche, they'll never sail on a proper ship.
Off topic or what?

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Thu Sep 29, 2016 2:55 am

Well I have to hand it to you re the brass magnet you obviously used to attract the prop " trimmings "
Our scrap metal hoarders over here have been trying to invent one since 1960 alas to no avail.
Should the trimmings be for your retirement best you get out to the shed tonight and "ping " the trimmings.
Would hate for you to find out on your sixty fifth your treasured hoard has electrolysis and is worth sweet Foxtrot Oscar.
Listen for the "ring "
Here's hoping you didn't centrepop those teeth to shut up the Wartsila chatter.
Drop of EP 140 in the lub oil should shut him up .
Just remembered where the BSB got their Bitumen/ Underseal coatings from.
Condensers and Circulating pumps.
Amongst my first jobs was the overhaul of same.
Make sure the eyebolt was fully home in the casing, backnut tight and on with the liftpull/chain blocks.
Remove the extractor bolts left in the casing, Out with the tap and with a plug tap tap out the screwed diameters in the casing to facilitate the extractor bolts and wind them in thus ( hopefully ) pushing it off the joint face.
Off with about what seemed 100 one inches approx nuts, ( no airwrenches yet here ) support the big old cast iron cover, out with the fox wedges and away from the joint faces and into the flange extensions of the cover went the foxwedges with a lump hammer.
Together with the extractor bolts and the foxwedges the cover began to separate itself from the Condenser itself against the six or so nuts you had left on the studs to prevent it from leaping all over the deck plates . ( bit like that seized front crank pulley with a hydraulic puller on it left overnight and found next day on the opposite side of the engineroom, night watchman said he heard a shotgun go off in the night which of course depicted the time the taper let go )
With your spring loaded welders chipping hammer you set about the long boring job of getting a years crud off the tube stack Cover assembly and each and every tube in the stack. ( bit like the charge aircooler / intercooler stack )
Superb engineering here.
Really nice bit of work each and every tube flared over and sealed both ends to provide a under the circulating pump pressure water seal. Allways like to see admire and see quality work, especially with what standards there are about today.
Now this was your introduction to the die nut.
Die each and every one of the set securing studs down ( like a set bolt, screwed right down to the end with only a small unscrewed diameter twixt the two threads ( which are often different T.P.I.s each end )
Chargehand comes over to see what you have done.
Joint faces, tubestack and all areas cleaned up are checked.
All studs are checked for any signs of the " wasting " effect, i.e. any undercut diameters.
Any studs showing signs of having a waist have to be changed.
Out with two of the nuts and backnut the situation ( like the tappet locknuts ) and try to unscrew the stud.
Badly waisted studs would shear off and now was your introduction to drilling and tapping should it shear off flush.
Grind/file the stud face and out with the centre punch.
Now about this time came out a new invention, the spring loaded centrepunch.
This had an adjustable compression spring tension and it did not take our apprentices long to work out that by placing it in your cupped hand and placing it against a person whom you did not like windscreen and set at maximum when pressed down would shatter the screen noiselessly or produce a large top to bottom crack.
Popping the sheared stud right in the centre and another new tool was brought into play, the centredrill.
Carefully place the centredrill in the centre pop and selecting slow speed on the drill (electric not air here, dead ship ) start to drill out.
Should the drill wander about out with the half round chisel and create a channel for the drill to wander back into thus creating the drilling spot on in the centre of the job.
Try the easy out extractor anti-clockwise one or splined one driven in.
Most of the time this was a no go so out with the correct no 1, 2, and 3 tap set.
Making sure that you used the correct sized drill for the core diameter (most important ) and carefully tap out the hole. No truncated threads wanted here.
Don't whatever you do shear the tap off in the casing
Deep shit.
Condenser could be scrap, spark erosion tool made a hell of a mess, sometimes you had to get the bits of the tap out after doing your hard chisel set in and drilling and tapping the casing oversize if there was enough meat there to take it.
And obviously the cover too.
Don't really want to go there.
Having completed all this work button it all up, new joint, water gasket sealer and tighten each and opposite to ensure the cover sits down square.
Don't forget to make sure the cover is not sat down on any of the extractor bolts, put them back in as the last operation.
Having done all of that move on to the other end of the condenser and hope that someone else is doing the other condenser (twin screw jobby here )
So endeth the lesson, just thought I'd mention it in case ( like me ) it's been many moons since I sheared off Condenser studding.
Best of luck with the P.P.E. ( prop pinging exercise ) may the ping/ring you seek be there after all of those years and should it be a dead sliver of the prop don't jump.
It's Friday tomorrow.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Fri Sep 30, 2016 1:13 am

Oh dear,
Forgot about rodding the tubes.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Redroof
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Redroof » Fri Sep 30, 2016 2:44 am

And here was me thinking I was in a similar league just because I have used oxy/accet cutting gear inside a scavenge belt to remove bits of liner, making up a top hat for the crosshead/ piston rod palm joint to keep the LO flow, removing the turbocharger rotor and making blanks before 5 legging it across the Pacific........... No spare as we had already used it due to a crack - the first time the spare liner was used in 18 years!
Then we did a generator overhaul which resulted in 6 new liners, pistons, con rods, turbocharger and not one of us understanding how the engine had ever been running as the clearances were more than twice the limits!
Two good sides, experience and the sale of all the scrap when we got to Taichung with 2 liners and all the generator stuff, it paid for some decent runs ashore and a considerable amount of beer in the bar............
Were them the days? I dont know, far longer trips, considerably less salary, but considerably less stress/ pressure or maybe that is just due to my rank now being Chief and then 4/E...........
Still, I wouldnt change it for the world though I do miss the slow speeds, something magical about the very obvious beating heart of the vessel.
Sorry to all you steam queens!!!!

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Fri Sep 30, 2016 4:59 am

Hmmm,
No mention of the Cathodes and Anodes problem here, being saved perchance for the big six five maybe methinks.
Making a liner last for eighteen years eh, quite an achievement in anyone's book.
Must have put an airline on the turbo inlet to keep up the boost pressure maybe.
Yes, I think the old days were certainly more carefree, more times ashore and certainly better beer runs.
( And the after effects too )
Round and Rounders, up and Downers, handy endorsement to the ticket should it ever come back big time.
All this talk about liners leads me to think your next response will lead to my A/C v C/W question correct answer being forthcoming or are you still not wishing to blow me out of the water, I respect the fact that you have ( knowingly of course ) been aware of the answer all along but did not wish to preempt the situation.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Redroof
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Redroof » Fri Sep 30, 2016 6:26 am

Looks to me like the CAC SW or the VC line has finally let go and the bilge alarms have all sounded with me on the tank top. The water is slowly lapping round my bearded chin as I consider drilling a hole in the hull to let the water back out..........
Do I pack my bags or admit I am out my depth............
Or are you playing with us youngsters like you always have, knowing that once we know the answer it is so blindingly obvious that we will kick ourselves and make sure we use the same formula in the past.
It's been a long time since I have been on the receiving end of a question like this, I am usually the on handing them out.....
But a good reminder that even with the ticket and position, every day remains a school day.........

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:01 am

That's ok duplicating oneself for a tidal depth gauge I think providing you are not using an electric drill to drill the hole but an air drill.
And of course not forgetting to ensure it is anti-clockwise rotation so as to wind the internal water you are trying to dispose of overboard.
Why you may ask.
Well the simple answer is of course the water follows the helix of the drill thus winding it out and not in.
It has been said that when in sea areas depicting a high SG that two start helical drills can be beneficial to use.
( bit like the two start helical plunger in an inline pump to make her go faster. )
It's rumoured JJ will be including this largely unknown trade secret in next years Chief tickets, ( steam and motor )
Factors depicting rates of flow ( less friction ) of course are directly proportion to the height of the person and the head of water one is up against, the SG and of course the OAT. ( outside air temperature )
The liner question?
The answers staring you in the face?
Sounds like you are no longer flogging up mains/bigends on Doxfords but have been promoted to medium speed stuff.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Redroof
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Redroof » Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:50 am

I don't see it as a promotion, better leave ratio and salary only.

Ah, the CW vs CCW question, of course, I have known all along, but I'm not the one to spoil your fun......

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JK
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby JK » Fri Sep 30, 2016 5:54 pm

Thank god, someone talks Merlyns language!

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Sat Oct 01, 2016 12:13 am

" AND SO SAY ALL OF US "

" Uneasy lies the head that wears the Crown "
Well I don't relish changing places with you this weekend, knowingly wandering around with knowledge that 1430 members of the site are crying out for.
Retention without just cause could be the cry.
All these folk desperate to advance their marine engineering knowledge being held back.
J J wants to put it in his next years syllabus Chiefs exams where it would sit nicely with the latest common rail technology.
Deprivation at its worst methinks.
Casting your mind back to the tickets,
PV/T =C
Disclosure could be akin to the foregoing.
1/1430 = local hero.
1= yourgoodself
1430 = no of appreciation memembers
Local hero= self explanatory.
As an expansion to the above today being Oct 1 I hear through the grapevine that Martin is preparing this years Xmas card list and as such is looking for heroes such as yourgoodself and by revealing all you could leapfrog the list thereby arriving in perhaps the top ten thus assuring yourself also of a genuine Stompers Medal. ( perhaps )
Further adulation from the 1430 members would undoubtably follow ( what a following ) so there is no need to be shy, impart your knowledge and remove the responsibility that you carry over this weekend concerning this liner problem.
However whilst making your correct decision I diversify somewhat in order to provide you with a little relief.
Knowing that you have had problems re the boom welding and reading my Birdshit Blobbers writeups you must by now feeling some concern re the standard of the welding and to that end have, maybe, been discussing this with the skipper.
Should this be the case the skipper would probably have asked the obvious question " how can we tell? "
Without any electrical penetration test kit on board how can you determine whether there are any troughs/ valleys non continuous ( i.e. Stitch )welding present on the job that has been filled up with Bitumen?
Should you have looked in that old Bitumen gallon tin left behind by the welder looking at the job and seeing virtually one gallon used up you must at the very least begin to feel uneasy.
Scraping and steam cleaning the Bitumen to expose the weld would make a hell of a mess.
All the crews eyes would be on your back and one of them might be a friend/relative of the welder.
Should the weld prove to be of a good standard deep shit and embarrassment all round.
Fear not for there is a virtually non conductive method of detecting troughs /valleys /Birdshit welding present on the job
You can carry this tool in your pocket.
But what is it?
When shortly you make known the liner problem answer ( which I know is forthcoming ) perhaps you will be kind enough to tack this BSB detection device on the end of it.
All I would ask is that you do not take so long in arriving at this seemingly complex marine engineering problem as the liner and as such would respectfully request that by twinning the two answers together for maximum impact may assure you of your Stompers medal from Martin by Xmas and who knows JK may mention you in despatches to same.
So in conclusion me and 1430 folks await your twin reply with much interest.




'
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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JK
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby JK » Sat Oct 01, 2016 5:19 pm

LOL. Not bitumen, methinks. Most likely a welding rod in the groove then gobbed over. If a little is enough the a whole lot it better.

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Merlyn
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Re: Welding on crane boom

Postby Merlyn » Sun Oct 02, 2016 12:18 am

Nope, the name of the detection device is what we are seeking here.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.


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