New engine

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Feliks
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Re: New engine

Postby Feliks » Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:06 pm

So here in slow motion you can see how the valve works in a four-stroke internal combustion engine .. You can see perfectly the "precision" of this mechanism .. It is best to watch it on the maximum screen .. You can see how the valve is when not pressed (and then there is a stroke of work with high pressure ) we are simply shaken by the effect of spring vibrations bouncing off the valve face and inertia .. At the bottom of this valve there is a "mushroom" which closes the way to the cylinder .. But since the valve stem dances so, the mushroom also makes such movements .. A since it performs these movements, even when it is "theoretically" closed, it really does not close the cylinder tightly, despite the fact that it is subject to a stroke pressure of up to 100 atmospheres. And we can imagine how much of this pressure escapes from the cylinder, on the effect of these "supposed" small, but very spoiling cylinder tightness, the movements of this mushroom .. Because at a pressure of 100 atmospheres, we can imagine that even a small gap, however, can even drop to 30 atmospheres make .. this mechanism is economical, and produced in virtually all internal combustion engines .. And complacency that the valve will be tight, because it presses it to the seat, high pressure in the cylinder is only the "wishful thinking" of the designers of such a system. because you can see that this is not true, because the valve sways and bounces off the socket, just when it should be closed ... This film helped me understand why my engine without these valves has such high efficiency and power, because how it receives in the cylinder, these 100 atmospheres, I will never lose my tightness all the time, closing the "valve", maybe like 2 atmospheres .. Well, but the amount of energy to use will be 3 times greater than in a traditional engine ... because 98 atmospheres .. And so on every cylinder .. adding to this even 40% more displacement, and twice as high achievable maximum revolutions, it also receives incredible power ten times greater than the original factory engine ... the load. Well, to find out about all this, I had to do [for 3 years of hard work a prototype of this engine, and say that it is so, although at first it did not seem to me at all, that so much is possible .. But it is thanks theoretically, to drive a Toddler (Fiat 126), with the same power as the original, you need a motor that will be smaller these ... 10 times .. But all this can not be determined by just watching the animations of my engine and criticizing me .. You need to spend your private million dollars to find out that this is the case ... And this film also shows that it is possible with all the imperfections of the current valve system ...
Even an indicator pressure test on an oscilloscope shows us that the pressure drops, but does not show us WHERE it escapes ... :lol:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adYrRk22GDQ


Andrew :D

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Feliks
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Re: New engine

Postby Feliks » Sat Oct 05, 2019 7:58 pm

In this film, you can imagine that on the other side of the valves there is the same disc as at the top and of course the wedges when it is to be closed, does the same at the bottom as this disc at the top of the springs

https://youtu.be/uUYn5kFFb5s

https://youtu.be/WtqDHJDN79w

https://youtu.be/_REQ1PUM0rY

https://youtu.be/pFTQrxQ3C3E

Andrew

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Feliks
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Re: New engine

Postby Feliks » Mon Oct 07, 2019 4:15 pm

Well, here in the film you can see that the valves are almost not open at higher revolutions .. The same is seen this opening, the air that is to enter the cylinder ..

And the sound that this mechanism produces is huge .. You can take my word for it that the whole sound (95%) of the four-stroke engine comes from the timing mechanism ...
My engine has only 5% of this mechanical sound,

But on the exhale ... world record ...evil

http://new4stroke.com/zawory%20napedzane.mp4

Andrew :D :D

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Merlyn
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Re: New engine

Postby Merlyn » Tue Oct 08, 2019 2:13 am

Greetings Alex,
What a super illustration of valve bounce and obviously well knackered guides.
If that depicted valve is an exhaust one and the wrist watch engine depicted has run for many hours then the red hot gases flowing continually across its seat during the bounce cycle must have been apparent by the damage caused to the seat and the valve face together with the closing up of the rocker clearance as the valve face recedes into the seat.
When the rocker reaches the supposed closed position you can clearly see the sideways slop as the stem has excess play present in the guide.
So off with the head, punch/ press out the guides, recut the seats 30 or maybe 45 degrees for a little fella like that and recut the seats, coarse/medium/ fine, change those knackered springs, beef it up maybe with an inner ( double coil setup ) and don't forget close coils go to the head and not to the top of the valves.
And reassemble and run up and don't forget to recheck the clearances ( might be a hot engine check ) and just hope that all that compression that you have now created by the head overhaul doesn't create more crankcase compression which will of course now cause the engine to now burn oil.
If it does join our club " it didn't burn oil before " speeches abound.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Feliks
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Re: New engine

Postby Feliks » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:02 pm

Do you know how much engine power goes to overcome losses in the timing mechanism? When designing, it is assumed that it is 10% of the maximum power of this engine .... But, after all, it is very rare to use the full maximum power .. to maintain speed in the city - 50 miles, usually not more than 20% of this is used maximum power .. .. But then the same amount of power goes to the camshaft ... as if we used the maximum power ... So, in fact, in driving in the city the timing drive goes up to 50% of the power used then ... we still have to overcome as much resistance as braking with a 4-stroke engine. I learned about it when I was driving a car with a two-stroke engine, which practically did not have engine braking ... So in summary - the timing drive and pressing the valve springs - I think, on average, there is 50% of the currently used power, which we need to overcome, thanks to our fuel. .. believe me.



Andrew

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Feliks
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Re: New engine

Postby Feliks » Sun Nov 17, 2019 2:07 pm

And here, as if someone wants to calculate the displacement of a new engine ... and thus everything you need then, is different from the current engine ..
and the first weld, which you will not see on the animation ... that the minimum volume of the combustion chamber is 370 degrees of rotation of the main crankshaft ..


http://new4stroke.com/volume/volume.htm


http://new4stroke.com/volume/volume.xls


Andrew

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Merlyn
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Re: New engine

Postby Merlyn » Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:25 am

Felix,
Concerning your write up re timing, do you refer to valve timing and/or injection timing?
If injection timing is it Common rail timing or the ( now old ) mechanical system?
If Common rail whose system are you referring to ?
If the old mechanical system duplex or single chain?
Spur or straight cut timing gears?
Hydraulic or spring tensioner system?
Hydraulic or straight mechanical tappets ?
Variable valve timing systems?
On the inlet cam only?
Hydraulically operated VVT on the inlet cam only, what %age of losses here?
The engine braking systems you refer to, bit of a loss for me here to see how this is effected but I presume you mean in a bit of a rough sea swell wise it means sliding down the other side of the wave with the prop. still in the water and the engine governor being pushed over its maximum rpm retardation occurs causing the prop. to act as a brake?
Once again mechanical or electrical governors applicable?
I.e. Mechanical or computer controlled retardation ?
Never seen a dynamometer log anywhere near as 50% losses concerning timing mechanisms / valve timings so with respect maybe your dynamometer requires calibration ?
Don't forget as well as BHP we are measuring SHP here ?
All of these important questions need an in depth reply fully explaining each and every answer setting out explanations necessary to enable the subject to be carried forward and as such further our experience in the world of Marine Engineering.

P.s.

As a matter of interest what make of dynamometer are you using over there?
The old water powered or the electronic brake type?
Clock or Counter clock shaft rotation?

PPS,

Happy Xmas ( in case you get it earlier than us over there ) and don't let the VVT spoil your Xmas.





.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.


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