saam smit

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banasa
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saam smit

Postby banasa » Sat Aug 27, 2016 9:28 am

Hi every one,
Any one is working or worked for saam smit in B.C as an egineer to share informations about this company
Thanks

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The Dieselduck
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Currently located: Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada (West Coast of Canada)

Re: saam smit

Postby The Dieselduck » Sun Aug 28, 2016 3:55 am

They're hiring engineers??? Usually they don't unless its for escort duties and then that's spotty work, last I heard, and a second class is needed.

The whole concept of having so many tugs, especially high powered ones with out engineers operating in and around Vancouver, is ridiculous in my view. But operators in the Vancouver area (and I use the term loosely), have been getting away with it for decades, as long as the tugs stay within "port limits"; which is quite a varying line, pretty soon, San Fransisco will be within port limits.
Martin Leduc
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banasa
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Re: saam smit

Postby banasa » Sun Aug 28, 2016 1:18 pm

You are right Martin, i agree with you regarding how ridiculous is to run a 6000 hp tug with a "simili" engineer, union's fights is lost since power is money.
Since there is no major accidents things will stay like that.
Happy to be in the last curve of my enginerr's career.

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JollyJack
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Re: saam smit

Postby JollyJack » Sun Aug 28, 2016 5:09 pm

From the Marine Personnel Regulations.

221 (1) A tug that is engaged on a voyage set out in column 1 of the table to this subsection and that has a propulsive power within a range set out in column 2 shall have on board, and its authorized representative shall employ, for each certificate referred to in column 3 that corresponds to that voyage and range, one engineer who holds, at a minimum, that certificate in the category appropriate to that vessel’s propulsion type.

TABLE

ENGINEER CERTIFICATES — TUGS
Item Column 1 Column 2 Column 3
Voyage Propulsive Power (kW) Certificates
1 Unlimited voyage or, if not operating only between Canadian ports, near coastal voyage, Class 1
(a) 750 to 1 999 (a) Third-class with a chief engineer endorsement and Fourth-class with a second engineer endorsement
(b) 2 000 to 3 000 (b) Second-class and Third-class
(c) more than 3 000 (c) First-class and Second-class

2 Near coastal voyage, Class 1 if operating only between Canadian ports
(a) 750 to 2 999 (a) Third-class
(b) 3 000 to 6 000 (b) Second-class
(c) more than 6 000 (c) First-class and Second-class

3 Near coastal voyage, Class 2
(a) 750 to 1 999 (a) Subject to subsection (2), Fourth-class
(b) 2 000 to 3999 (b) Third-class
(c) 4 000 to 7 000 (c) Second-class
(d) more than 7 000 (d) First-class and Third-class

4 Limited near coastal voyage, Class 2 or sheltered waters voyage
(a) 1 500 to 2 999 (a) Subject to subsection (2), Fourth-class
(b) 3 000 to 5 000 (b) Subject to subsection (3), Third-class
(c) more than 5 000 (c) Subject to subsection (3), Second-class

(2)
A tug that has a propulsive power of at least 750 kW but not more than 1 999 kW and that is engaged on a near coastal voyage, Class 2, or a tug that has a propulsive power of at least 1 500 kW but not more than 2 999 kW and that is engaged on a limited near coastal voyage, Class 2 or a sheltered waters voyage, of less than 6 hours’ duration, may have on board and its authorized representative may employ, a person who holds a Small Vessel Machinery Operator certificate, instead of the engineer required by paragraph (a) in column 3 of item 3 or 4 of the table to subsection (1), if

(a) the tug has a propulsion system comprised of at least two independent engines with respect to their control and fuel systems and that duplication allows for continued propulsion and steering should one engine fail;

(b) the propulsion system is controlled from the bridge with all necessary gauges, alarms and engine and emergency controls;

(c) continuous radio contact is maintained with the home base;

(d) the authorized representative provides

(i) a list of pre-departure procedures and verifications, which procedures and verifications shall be carried out by the small vessel machinery operator before each departure, and

(ii) a maintenance schedule meeting the recommendations of the manufacturer of the main engines, which maintenance shall be carried out by

(A) an engineer who holds at least a Fourth-class Engineer certificate, or

(B) a service firm accredited by the manufacturer of the main engines with which the authorized representative has entered into a maintenance contract; and

(e) records of the pre-departure procedures are readily available, for inspection by a marine safety inspector, on board the vessel or, if the vessel does not travel more than five nautical miles from its home port, readily available in its home port.

(3) A harbour tug of less than 500 gross tonnage that is not a passenger-carrying vessel, that is being used to assist a vessel to dock or undock and that is at no time more than five nautical miles from an accessible dock offering refuge may have on board and its authorized representative may employ, a person who holds a Small Vessel Machinery Operator certificate, instead of the person required by paragraph (b) or (c) in column 3 of item 4 of the table to subsection (1), if

(a) the harbour tug complies with the requirements of Schedule VIII to the Marine Machinery Regulations;

(b) a shore engineer is available and ready to intervene should the master determine that the vessel requires immediate assistance;

(c) the authorized representative provides a list of pre-departure procedures and verifications, which procedures and verifications shall be carried out by the small vessel machinery operator before each departure;

(d) records of the pre-departure procedures are readily available, for inspection by a marine safety inspector, on board the vessel or, if the vessel does not travel more than five nautical miles from its home port, readily available in its home port; and

(e) continuous radio contact is maintained with the home base.

The kicker here is in subsections (2) and (3) which allow a Small Vessel Machinery Operator to act as Engineer on harbour tugs, in the case of (3) regardless of power as long as it is under 500 Gross tonnage.
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JollyJack
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Re: saam smit

Postby JollyJack » Sun Aug 28, 2016 5:14 pm

Maybe I should explain that Near Coastal Class 1 is up to 200 miles from shore, NC Class 2 is up to 25 miles from shore, "sheltered waters" are designated in the Regulations.
Discourage incest, ban country "music".

Revolver
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Re: saam smit

Postby Revolver » Sat Sep 17, 2016 8:18 pm

JJ, you're talking about rules and regulations and we're talking about West coast operations - the two don't jive heh.
I've worked in Vancouver and the place is the wild west, like going back in time from what I've witnessed.
Safety was out the window, attitudes were so nonchalant about everything...

As for the regulations you're citing, exactly as you said was the kicker, they just have an svmo ticket and are under 500gt no matter what they're doing or where they're going...

NB - just from my couple of months experience on tugs and working with other tugs over there.

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JollyJack
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Re: saam smit

Postby JollyJack » Sun Sep 18, 2016 8:50 pm

Which is why the left coast is referred to as "la-la-land".
Discourage incest, ban country "music".

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JK
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Re: saam smit

Postby JK » Mon Sep 19, 2016 11:51 am

I found going out there to work was like going back 6-8 years in processes. That's only in my field. It really was astounding.i can only imagine in the tug industry.


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