Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

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Merlyn
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Re: Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

Post by Merlyn »

Thats a good answer and of course would possibly do the job.
But as I said leads that is the answer sought.
Looking at the age of your building I would consider that what we seek has been there a considerable time.
And although possibly in daily use for years would do the job of taking leads admirably.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Merlyn
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Re: Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

Post by Merlyn »

As no takers for this one I maybe ought to explain to perhaps the persons not familiar with solid white metal bearings in machinery that is was not allways sprayed on white metal onto copper backed steel shells in mains / bigends / camshaft etc bearings but in older marine steam engines ( and turbines ) solid white metal bearings had to be cast via a made up mandrel, bored and painstakingly scraped in on the job.
This was a very skilled and not easy job which some of our apprentices in the early sixties never mastered the art of doing correctly.
So back to BP's steam engines in order for him to scrape in the white metal bearings without any leads in his box I enclose a photo. of my 1960 micrometer together with the necessary leads ( but not taken from his box ) which can clearly be seen to measure in imperial the leads shown, but these are taken from where and how can the intrepid marine engineer ( i.e. your good self ) save the ship/ shore based steam engine?
I was always taught a proper marine engineer would always be a cut above a normal engineer and as such would be capable of engineering himself out of ANY situation in order to show his skills off to the world out there watching.
So how can you take leads when you don't have any?
So four leads across the journal, all shims in and torque up ( if any torque shown for this old stuff ) if not F.T. to be applied.
Remember the micrometer measurement shows the oil clearance not encompassing any oil ways to be cut.

This would be approx. the running oil clearance of the journal on that size steam engine.
That is to say the measurement either side of the journal.
But back to the original question, where are these leads from?
How can you solve this problem in order to save the day?
Think about the envirement in an engine room / machinery room ashore.
As I did not research this you won't find the answer through any research but as I dreamt it up so can the reader?
Think about it and the answer will come to you.
So what is the mic. measurement show?
Where did these leads come from?
PS
It's the same as leads i.e. Lead and tin content.
Dont be caught on a lee shore here.

..
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Merlyn
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Re: Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

Post by Merlyn »

IMG_0884.JPG
Forgot the Mike
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Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Merlyn
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Re: Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

Post by Merlyn »

Some would say that retirement is akin to a high revving engine consistently under load suddenly and abruptly shut down to tick over possibly creating localized overheat problems etc and rendering the whole plant to happenings never experienced before.
Similarly effecting retirement by shutting down completely can bring on all kinds of health problems etc as we are all so well aware of when folk retire so I would appeal to BP to set aside those golf clubs and revert back to solving our " the taking of the leads " problem in time for his reopening party.
By sitting down and looking at those old walls containing the steam engines he has to gaze at them in an attempt to seek inspirations.
In what we seek four of is better than one of ( as we seek four of to take leads correctly remember )
A thirty one will do nicely ( multiplied by four )
He will however have to conduct the repairs in the daylight hours only.
Don't pull that throttle right back yet BP,
Continue to be a resourceful marine engineer and solve this problem.
It is a solvable one.
Or any help from any other problem solvers out there?
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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Merlyn
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Re: Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

Post by Merlyn »

Cartridge ones won't fit in the oil clearance gap to be measured but the older type ones which do exactly the same job will.
You could say it's just a phase you are going through.
Remembering The Good Old days, when Chiefs stood watches and all Torque settings were F.T.

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The Dieselduck
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Re: Historic Steam Engine + Bill Gates

Post by The Dieselduck »

Fascinating discussion. I have no experience whatsoever in steam, so i find it very interesting to read. There is an old steam plant open for tours in Hamilton, used to supply water from lake ontario to the town of Hamilton, a beautiful, but non functioning steam engine.

I would love to have a visit of the museum in England, but that must wait for a couple more years, luckily I can wait in my own home, unlike Big Pete. Sorry to hear about your holiday.
2011.12-Hamilton Steam Museum.31.jpg
2011.12-Hamilton Steam Museum.16.jpg
2011.12-Hamilton Steam Museum.10.jpg
2011.12-Hamilton Steam Museum.04.jpg
2011.12-Hamilton Steam Museum.03.jpg
Martin Leduc
Certified Marine Engineer and Webmaster
Martin's Marine Engineering Page
http://www.dieselduck.net

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