DUCK NOTES #02
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CSA – Oil Pollution Prevention Regulations 1998
The abridge, plain text, version from www.dieselduck.net

Section 1-3 Short Title and definitions (extended list of what means what)

Section 2 Application = all Canadian ships, or operating in Canada except Gov. & non commercial vessels  

Section 3 What is a pollutant = “oil and any oily mixture”

Oil Record Book (Documentation) – applies mostly to ship’s master + C/E

Section 5 (1-6) Cover the “Oil Record Book” – (ORB).

  1. All ships over 400gt, all tankers over 150gt must have Oil Record Book Part 1 (Machinery Space Operations).
  2. All tankers must carry, in addition to the Machinery Space Operations book, the Oil Record Book, Part 2 (Cargo Ballast Operations).
  3. Machinery Space Operations must be recorded each time, without delay and signed by OIC. And subsequently signed by the master.
  4. Same as 3 except for Cargo Ballast Operations (ORB, Part 2) on tankers.
  5. Says that the ORB can be part of the ship’s log
  6. …and must be kept and ready for inspection onboard for three years.

Section 6 – Other documents to be carried onboard in French or English. All ships over 400gt, all tankers over 150gt must have:

1.        One of these…

  1.  Canadian Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate

  2. International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate

  3. Certificate of Compliance

2.        A Type Test Certificate. An official “yup, it works” certificate as it applies to the equipment carried onboard.  I.e. PPM monitor,  OWS etc.

3.        Operator Manuals for the equipment carried

4.        Information and Data referred to in 25(5)(a) & (b) (sorry, I have no idea as to where to find this subsection) 

Part 1 – Construction – applies mostly to the ship’s owner

Section 8 – Anyone planning on altering or repairing various areas of a ship (sub-section list the areas and the type of ship they apply to – basically oil storage & handling areas), must submit four copies of those plans to the Board for approval. 

Section 9 – Applies to Bunkering “Catch alls” and their application, size to various vessels to contain spills. 

Section 10 – Applies to “Catch alls” on tankers (Cargo Operations). A table list the sizes required to the piping.  

Section  11 – Ships must have a slop tank capable of handling sufficient quantity of slop produce during the expected voyage & capable of being cleaned.  

Section  12 – Prohibits oil in tanks forward of the collision bulkhead. 

Section 13 – Applies to ships other than a tanker which have capabilities to carry oil as cargo. 

Section  14 – Piping system for bilge and sludge tank: at least one pump, at least one outlet  on weather deck with stop valve,  no direct connection OB. 14.1 requires a emergency stop for stopping sludge pump discharge, at discharge location (on weather deck - remote).  

Section 14.2 – Any oil tankers shall be double hull construction as per TP11710. 

Section  15 & 16 – Addresses the required equipment on oil tankers. Types, ages of tankers and required equipment are addressed in sub sections. I.e. 15 & 100 ppm OWS, monitor, alarms, oily water interface detector, slop tank, segregated ballast, crude washing system, etc.  

Section 17 – List the international statutory requirements which a particular piece of equipment must live up to. 

Section  18 – Requires the owner of a tanker to submit four copies of the Operators Manual to the board for oil discharge monitor & control system, crude washing system and inert gas system.  

Section  19 – Required equipment on small ships not covered by the regs above (ships under 400gt & tankers under 150gt). Mainly a capable slop tank & appropriate OWS. 

Part 2 – Inspection and Certificates – applies mostly to ship’s owner 

Section 20 – interpretation – applies to all ships over 400gt and tankers over 150gt. 

Section 21 – Initial and Periodic Inspections. Ships must be inspected by steamship inspector. I.e. new builds, registry transfer, or on issue of it’s first Canadian Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate.  Certificate is good for five years. 

Section  22 – Intermediate Inspections. An owner may get an Intermediate Inspection every 2 or 3 years.  

Section  23 – Annual inspections. Every ship must have a steamship inspector do an annual survey.  

Section  24 – Non propelled ships may have Periodic, Intermediate and Annual inspections done by a Classification Society, but must notify the Board. 

Section  25 – Major changes, repairs or alteration to oil handling fittings, equipment and systems must be reported to the board. The board may require an inspection. 

Section 26 – Recognizes inspections by approved classification society. 

Part 3 – Oil and Oily Mixture discharges – applies mostly to shipboard engineers, and personnel

Section  27 – No oil or mixture is to be discharged by a ship in Canadian jurisdiction. Unless …

a)       a discharge is necessary for the purpose of saving lives or preventing the immediate loss of a ship.

b)       a discharge occurs as a result of an accident of navigation in which the ship or its equipment is damaged, unless the accident occurs as a result of an action that is outside the ordinary practice of seamen;

c)       minimal and unavoidable leakage occurs due to the operation of an underwater machinery component; or

d)       a discharge is made for the purpose of scientific research into pollution abatement or control in accordance with permission granted therefore by the Board.  

Section  28 – Authorizes discharges in Division 1 ("Division I waters" means fishing zones 1, 2 and 3 and those internal waters that are not within a shipping safety control zone) only if…

(a) the ship is making way;

(b) no oily mixture 

(i) originates in cargo pump room bilges, or

(ii) is mixed with oil cargo residues;

(c) the discharge is processed through oil filtering equipment that

(i) produces an undiluted effluent that has an oil content of no more than 15 p.p.m., and

(ii) triggers an alarm and a discharge stopping device as soon as the oil content in the effluent exceeds

(A) 5 p.p.m., where discharged in inland waters of Canada, or

(B) 15 p.p m., where discharged in fishing zones 1, 2, 3 or in those internal waters that do not include inland waters of Canada; and

(d) the discharge does not contain chemicals or any other substance introduced for the purpose of circumventing the detection of concentrations of oil that exceed the oil content limits specified in this section. 

Section 32 – Applies to Division 2 oily water mixture discharges (Division 2 waters means the territorial sea and portions of fishing zones 4, 5 and 6 that are not within a shipping safety control zone).

Section 33 – (1) Authorizes  discharge of an oily mixture if…

(a) the ship is making way;

(b) no oily mixture

(i) originates in cargo pump room bilges, or

(ii) is mixed with oil cargo residues;

(c) the discharge is processed through oil filtering equipment that produces an undiluted effluent having an oil content of no more than 15 p.p.m.; and

(d) the discharge does not contain chemicals or any other substance introduced for the purpose of circumventing the detection of concentrations of oil that exceed the oil content limits specified in this section.

(2) - A ship that is put into service before July 6, 1993 may, until July 6, 1998, discharge an oily mixture if the requirements of paragraphs (1)(a), (b) and (d) are met and

(a) the ship is more than 12 nautical miles from the nearest land;

(b) the discharge is processed through oily-water separating equipment or through oil filtering equipment that produces an undiluted effluent having an oil content of no more than 100 p.p.m.; and

(c) in the case of a ship of 10,000 tons gross tonnage or more, the oil discharge monitoring and control system is in operation.

Section 34 - The discharge of an oily mixture from cargo spaces is authorized from any oil tanker in Division 2 waters if

(a) the oil tanker is making way;

(b) the oil tanker is more than 50 nautical miles from the nearest land;

(c) the instantaneous rate of discharge of the oil that is in the effluent does not exceed 30 L per nautical mile;

(d) the total quantity of oil discharged into the sea does not comprise

(i) in the case of an oil tanker that was put into service on or before December 31, 1979, more than 1/15,000 of the cargo of which the oily mixture forms part,  

(ii) in the case of an oil tanker that is put into service after December 31, 1979, more than 1/30,000 of the cargo of which the oily mixture forms part, or

(iii) notwithstanding subparagraph (i), in the case of an oil tanker that is transferred to Canadian registry after February 16, 1993, more than 1/30,000 of the cargo of which the oily mixture forms part; and

(e) the oil discharge monitoring and control system is in operation and can stop the discharge of any effluent having an oil content greater than that allowed under paragraph (c) or (d). 

Part 4 – Transferring operations -  applies mostly to shipboard engineers and personnel

Section 35 – Application of these regs is to ships over 400gt, and tankers over 150gt. Exceptions to unmanned oil tankers are defined here. 

Section 36 – Communication. There must be a means of communication between all parties involve in the transfer operation. I.e for emergency shutdowns, blowouts. 

Section 37 – Lighting. Adequate lighting must be provided, standards are set out in subsections. 

Section 38 – Conduit and its condition. Must have bursting pressure of 4x its working pressure.  Must have been hydrostatically tested to 1.5 working pressure once a year and test certificate must be available.   

Section 39 – Applies to reception facility for sludge and proper piping system.  

Section 40 – The ship’s owner is responsible that transfers are carried out by a licensed officer or by a person with documented evidence issued by a steamship inspector as to the competence of the person.

Section 41 – Is similar to the 40, but for the shore facility.

Section 42 – Outlines responsibilities for the OIC. The supervisor of a transfer operation for a ship shall ensure that

(a) the ship is satisfactorily secured, having regard to the weather and tidal and current conditions, and that the mooring lines are tended so that the movement of the ship does not damage the transfer conduit and its connections;

(b) transfer procedures are established with the concurrence of the supervisor of the transfer operation at the loading facility, unloading facility or other ship, as the case may be, with respect to

(i) the rates of flow and pressures for the transferred liquid,

(ii) the reduction of rates of flow and pressures where required to avoid any overflow of the tanks,

(iii) the time required to stop the transfer operation under normal conditions,

(iv) the time required to shut down the transfer operation under emergency conditions, and

(v) the communication signals for the transfer operation, including

(A) stand by to start transfer,

(B) start transfer,

(C) slow down transfer,

(D) stand by to stop transfer,

(E) stop transfer,

(F) emergency stop of transfer, and

(G) emergency shutdown of transfer;

(c) the supervisor of the transfer operation at the loading facility, unloading facility or other ship, as the case may be, has reported readiness for the commencement of the transfer operation;

(d) the person who is on duty on that ship in respect of the transfer operation is fully conversant with the communication signals, maintains watch over the ship's tanks to ensure that they do not overflow and maintains continuous communication with that person's counterpart on the loading or unloading facility or on the other ship, as the case may be;

(e) the manifold valves and tank valves on the ship are not closed until the relevant pumps are stopped, if that closing would cause dangerous over-pressurization of the pumping system;

(f) the rate of flow is reduced when topping off the tanks;

(g) the supervisor of the transfer operation at the loading or unloading facility or for the other ship is given sufficient notice of the stopping of the transfer operation so as to permit that supervisor to take the necessary action to reduce the rate of flow or pressure in a safe and efficient manner;

(h) the following measures are taken to prevent oily discharge, namely,

(i) all cargo and bunker manifold connections that are not being used in the transfer operation are securely closed and fitted with blank flanges or other equivalent means of closure,

(ii) all overboard discharge valves are securely closed and marked to indicate that they are not to be opened during the transfer operation, and

(iii) all scuppers are plugged;

(i) a supply of peat moss or other absorbent material is readily available near every transfer conduit to facilitate the clean-up of any minor spillage that may occur on the ship or on the shore; and

(j) all transfer conduits that are used in the transfer operation

are supported to prevent them and their connections from being subject to strain that might damage or disconnect them.

Section 43 – Outlines responsibilities of the shore facility.  Mainly continuous communication with OIC, not close valves before pumps are off.

Section 44 – The master of a ship must take all necessary action to minimize the effects of an emergency.

Section 45 – Reception facility must issue receipt for the amount of sludge / oily residue taken, and the receipt must be kept onboard for one year to be shown if requested.

Part 5 – Emergency Plans – applies mostly to ship’s owner

Section 45 – All ships >400gt, tankers >150gt in Canadian Jurisdiction must have a Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan which has been approved by the board after submitting them four copies.  Plan depends on the location; north of the 60th parallel or south.

Section 46 – States that Canada is a Pollution Convention signatory, therefore all ships not from signatory nation must abide by Canadian standards while in Canadian Jurisdiction.

Section  47 – As to do with designation of pollution officers, and

Section 48 – their authority vis a vis the ship’s master. 

Annex contains form layout for Emergency Plan for north of 60, and south.

DuckNotes #2 Martin’s Marine Engineering Page, www.dieselduck.net, September 23, 2002 - comments